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The petition thing doesn't work for all issues

Refuse the Juice - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 3:03pm
I've been meaning to cover this since reading it in the El Paso Herald Post Gazette Times Dispatch Courier Tribune HERE. So there's a group called "El Paso Grassroots Coalition," which is a dumb name to begin with. "Grassroots" describes... Brad Kanus
Categories: Local Blogs

A Response to 'Diversity and Its Discontents'

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 11:27am
A Response to 'Diversity and Its Discontents'

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Sophomoric analysis from The Economist magazine, a source not normally known for lazy commen...

Categories: Local Blogs

An Interview with Top Boston ICE Official Todd Lyons

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 11:27am
An Interview with Top Boston ICE Official Todd Lyons

Bryan Griffith
March 3, 2019 - 9:34pm
Source: [url=https://cis.org/Video/Interview-ICE-Acting-Field-Office-Directo...
Categories: Local Blogs

1984

ElPasoSpeak - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 8:02am

We got the article below from https://9to5mac.com/2019/02/22/facebook-personal-data-ios-apps/

A new investigative report from The Wall Street Journal today looks into the controversial practice of popular third-party iOS and Android apps sending very personal user data to Facebook. In some cases, this happened immediately after an app recorded new data, even if the user wasn’t logged into Facebook or wasn’t a Facebook user at all. Notably, the report highlights that Apple and Google don’t require apps to divulge all the partners that user data is shared with.

 

WSJ noted how we share some of the most intimate details of our lives with apps.

Millions of smartphone users confess their most intimate secrets to apps, including when they want to work on their belly fat or the price of the house they checked out last weekend. Other apps know users’ body weight, blood pressure, menstrual cycles or pregnancy status.

What the investigative report discovered was that Facebookpurchases this personal data from apps, and in many cases has access to it as soon as new data is recorded. Further, this happens even when users aren’t logged in to Facebook or don’t even have an account.

The social-media giant collects intensely personal information from many popular smartphone apps just seconds after users enter it, even if the user has no connection to Facebook, according to testing done by The Wall Street Journal. The apps often send the data without any prominent or specific disclosure, the testing showed.

WSJ notes that many of Facebook’s controversial user tracking strategies have been uncovered over the last couple of years, but this investigation uncovered even more concerning details, like what in-app data 11 popular apps are sharing with Facebook.

It is already known that many smartphone apps send information to Facebook about when users open them, and sometimes what they do inside. Previously unreported is how at least 11 popular apps, totaling tens of millions of downloads, have also been sharing sensitive data entered by users. The findings alarmed some privacy experts who reviewed the Journal’s testing.

The tricky part for users is that iOS and Android apps aren’t required by Apple and Google to disclose all of the partners that have access to your data. What’s more, with the apps tested, there was no clear way to prevent them from sending data to Facebook.

Some of the example’s include heart rate app, Instant Heart Rate: HR Monitor, Flo a period and ovulation tracker, and Realtor.com’s app.

In the Journal’s testing, Instant Heart Rate: HR Monitor, the most popular heart-rate app on Apple’s iOS, made by California-based Azumio Inc., sent a user’s heart rate to Facebook immediately after it was recorded.

Flo Health Inc.’s Flo Period & Ovulation Tracker, which claims 25 million active users, told Facebook when a user was having her period or informed the app of an intention to get pregnant, the tests showed.

Real-estate app Realtor.com, owned by Move Inc., a subsidiary of Wall Street Journal parentNews Corp , sent the social network the location and price of listings that a user viewed, noting which ones were marked as favorites, the tests showed.

Even when users aren’t logged into Facebook, the company can often match up personal data from third-party apps to users once it receives the data.

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We deserve better

Brutus

Categories: Local Blogs

Why Immigrants at CPAC Like Donald Trump

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 5:00am
Why Immigrants at CPAC Like Donald Trump

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Panel Transcript: The Value of Foreign Diplomas

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 5:00am
Panel Transcript: The Value of Foreign Diplomas

[html]Bryan Griffith
March 3, 2019 - 8:41pm

           
Categories: Local Blogs

Panel Video: The Value of Foreign Diplomas

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 5:00am
Panel Video: The Value of Foreign Diplomas

[html]Bryan Griffith
March 3, 2019 - 8:24pm

           
Categories: Local Blogs

Newly Revealed Statistics Show USCIS Quietly Nibbling Away at the H-1B Program

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/04/2019 - 5:00am
Newly Revealed Statistics Show USCIS Quietly Nibbling Away at the H-1B Program

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Newly revealed government statistics show that USCIS, on a ...

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Border Mic – Episode 7 – Being Mexican and Crossing the Border

EPN - Border Analysis - Sun, 03/03/2019 - 11:00pm
Being a Mexican national and crossing the U.S.-México border is not simply having your papers in order. You […]
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Hidden in plain sight, e-cigs complicate efforts to cut teen tobacco use

Borderzine - Sun, 03/03/2019 - 1:48pm

E-cigarettes that look like USB flash drives are making it harder for adults to crack down on their illegal use among minors – even in school hallways.

Shacel De La Vega, a 2018 graduate of Coronado High School in El Paso, said it wasn’t hard to get a nicotine boost almost any time on campus using Juuls, slim vaping devices that are the size of a data stick.

“Other than just letting us know that it was not allowed, there wasn’t really any sort of system that they had set up to stop us from using it,” De La Vega said.

While still in school, De La Vega missed the optional presentation educators gave to students about vaping. Students were told that underage possession of tobacco products is against the law and the school would be cracking down on campus use.

“We’re seeing e-cigs and vapors coming into students’ possession. We want to inform them that it is against the law for students under the age of 18 to possess these tobacco products,” said EPISD Police Officer Chris Rodriguez.

“We’re trying prevent them from getting into trouble and also letting them know that this can affect their health. We hope this gets students to say no to vaping or prevents a purchase.”

E-cigarettes have been the most popular tobacco product among middle and high school students since 2014 according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Food and Drug Administrations’ (FDA) National Youth Tobacco Survey in 2017. Vaping among high school students increased “an astounding” 900 percent from 2011 to 2015 according to a 2016 report by the U.S. Surgeon General.

Last June, the Centers for Disease Control reported that overall tobacco use was down among U.S. minors, but among the 3.6 million tobacco product teen users in 2017, a total of 2.1 million used e-cigarettes.

“We’re encouraged by the recent declines in overall youth tobacco use; however, we must do more to address the disturbingly high number of youth who are using e-cigarettes,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. in a press release for CDC Newsroom.

The appeal of the Juul among teenagers can be broken down to three main factors: design, emission and flavors.

Because its Juuls look like a USB flash drive and don’t emit a large amount of vapor, teens are easily able to hide it from parents and teachers. Juul pods of nicotine liquid come in a variety of appealing flavors like mango, cool mint, fruit medley, cool cucumber and crème brulee. Juul Labs also makes Virginia tobacco, classic tobacco and classic menthol flavored pods, but the sweet flavors that are the most popular among young people.

Not everyone gets away with it all the time on school campus. De La Vega remembers a number of instances where students were caught with Juuls. In one case, educators used Snapchat to track down students who were trying to discreetly sell Juul vapes and pods to classmates. The students used the “Our Story” feature of Snapchat, which made their videos viewable by anyone near their location.

“There was always some sort of Juul related story and anyone in or around Coronado could see it. Everyone had Snapchat, including teachers” De La Vega said. “It wasn’t hard to figure out who was selling by their usernames.”

Eddy Frayre works at a convenience store down the street from Franklin High School in El Paso. He has watched the growth in popularity in e-cigarettes and said he has regular customers that come in exclusively for Juul pods.

“I do see a lot of young people from 18-25 coming in and buying the Juuls. Cucumber is the one that sells the most out of all of them but we ALWAYS ask for ID,” Frayre said.

However, even if students who are 18 can legally purchase vape products, possession of them on campus could still lead to potential disciplinary action from the school.

While schools are on the front lines trying to limit e-cigarrette use, they’re getting some back up from allies who have been working to curtail all tobacco use in the El Paso, Juarez and Southern New Mexico.

 

A Smoke-free Paso del Norte is an initiative aimed at decreasing smoking rates among adults and adolescents in the Paso del Norte region. El Paso saw a dramatic decrease in smoking rates since it became the first city in Texas to adopt a Clean Air Ordinance in 2002. According to the Paso Del Norte Health Foundation, “when the ordinance was implemented, the adult smoking rate was 24 percent. As of 2015, this rate declined to 13.8 percent, well ahead of the national rate of 17.5 percent.”

Last year, the Smoke-free Paso del Norte program launched a series of public service messages targeting special population groups, including teens and e-cigarette users.

The FDA has also taken action to examine the youth appeal of the Juul and other e-cigarettes and announced in September a plan to make e-cigarettes less appealing to youth.

“In the coming weeks, we’ll take additional action under our Youth Tobacco Prevention Plan to immediately address the youth access to, and the appeal of, these products,” said FDA Commissioner Gottlieb in a press release.

Actions could include limiting flavors and designs that appeal to young people as well as making sure that all products are properly labeled to prevent underage children from exposure to nicotine.

The FDA conducted an unannounced visit to the headquarters of Juul Labs in September, leaving with more than 1,000 documents related to the companies’ sales and marketing practices in order to determine whether or not Juul was specifically targeting teenagers in their marketing.

This month, Gottlieb shared letters he sent to Juul and its partner Altria, the maker of Marlborough cigarettes, questioning their commitment to prevent teen vaping. Gottlieb requested a meeting to discuss the implications of this new partnership with a major tobacco company.

“JUUL should be prepared to explain how this acquisition by Altria affects the commitments you made to the FDA about addressing the crisis of youth use ofJUUL products,” Gottlieb wrote.

 

 

Click hear to read Hidden in plain sight, e-cigs complicate efforts to cut teen tobacco use

Categories: Local Blogs

EPISD reinventing the wheel

ElPasoSpeak - Sun, 03/03/2019 - 5:00am

The February 12, 2019 EPISD board packet had this item in it:

EPISD would like to contract with a vendor to develop an all-In-one enrollment solution.  Funds are going to be requested from several accounts to cover the year 1 contracted services quote of$547,950.00.

That’s half a million dollars for the first year on an item that it appears was never taken out to bid.  Notice that the system needs to be developed.

This is a risky project.

It is hard to believe that no other school district–anywhere–has an all-in-one enrollment solution already.

We deserve better

Brutus

Categories: Local Blogs

RumpToons No: 122

EPN - Border Analysis - Sat, 03/02/2019 - 11:00pm
I hope you enjoy RumpToons No: 122
Categories: Local Blogs

At CPAC, the Culture War Matters More than Politics or Policy

US Immigration Reform Forum - Sat, 03/02/2019 - 6:05pm
At CPAC, the Culture War Matters More than Politics or Policy

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Texas moves to prohibit Tigua casino gambling in El Paso

Borderzine - Sat, 03/02/2019 - 11:16am

On the heels of a major victory in a decades-old dispute over gambling conducted by El Paso’s Tigua Indians, the Texas Attorney General’s Office is asking a federal judge for an injunction that would ban or greatly restrict the gaming now conducted at the tribe’s Ysleta del Sur Pueblo.

Such an injunction could lead to the closure or major downsizing of the Tigua peoples’ Speaking Rock Entertainment Center, the border tribe’s most lucrative enterprise and the focal point of a legal dispute with the state that dates to 1993.

The Texas Attorney General’s Office on Friday recommended that U.S. District Judge Philip Martinez issue an injunction that prohibits the Tigua “from engaging in, permitting, promoting, or operating gambling activities on the Ysleta del Sur Pueblo’s reservation that violate one or more of the following” Texas laws and regulations regarding gambling. “This includes, but is not limited to, the one-touch machines described in the (Feb. 14 order issued by Martinez) and the live-called bingo described in the order.”

The state’s latest lawsuit seeking to stop gambling on Tigua land was set to go to trial on March 4, but Martinez on Feb. 14 issued a summary judgment in favor of the state, a court order that essentially says the facts and legal arguments in a lawsuit are so one-sided that no trial is necessary.

In his summary judgment ruling, Martinez said he would issue a permanent injunction that would restrict gambling on Tigua tribal land, but he invited the state and tribe to submit suggested language for such an injunction by 5 p.m. Friday. The state submitted its suggested language through the attorney general, but the Tigua declined to do so.

“The pueblo defendants appreciate the court’s willingness to hear from the parties on this issue. Two reasons, however, have led the Pueblo Defendants to submit this response in lieu of proposed language for a permanent injunction: (1) the lack of need for a permanent injunction; and (2) the possibility that on appeal submission of proposed language could be interpreted as a waiver of objection to the injunction,” tribal attorney Randolph Barnhouse of Albuquerque said in a Friday filing with the court.

Martinez’s ruling did not give a timeline on when he might issue a permanent injunction after Friday’s deadline for the parties to submit ideas. If he adopts the state’s suggested language, an injunction would end all of the machine games at Speaking Rock and limit the tribe to no more than 12 hours of bingo games a week.

Barnhouse also filed a motion on Friday asking Martinez to reconsider his summary judgment ruling.

A Tigua statue greets visitors to Speaking Rock Casino in El Paso, which a federal judge has ruled is violating Texas gaming laws.

Reducing or eliminating gambling at Speaking Rock could have economic repercussions across El Paso. The Tigua have not released a recent employee count for Speaking Rock, but the tribe says it employs 1,200 people in its enterprises, one-third of whom are tribal members. The Tigua use revenue from Speaking Rock to fund health care, education and social welfare programs for 4,200 tribal members.

Speaking Rock also is a significant advertiser for El Paso media and a sponsor of the Thrifty Thursday promotion for the El Paso Chihuahuas baseball team, among other community promotional efforts.  

The Tigua and the state have engaged in numerous court battles over the past quarter century, with the state ultimately prevailing in two previous lawsuits. Speaking Rock operated for several years as a Las Vegas-style casino with slot machines, table games and bingo, but was shut down in 2002 after the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a trial judge’s ruling that the casino violated state law.

The tribe reopened a scaled-down gambling operation offering different games over the years, often triggering new legal fights with the state. Speaking Rock currently offers round-the-clock bingo and more than 2,500 slot machine-style games that the tribe says are electronic bingo machines, Martinez said in his ruling.

In his ruling, Martinez agreed with the Texas Attorney General’s Office that the Tiguas’ 24-hour-a-day, seven-days-a-week gambling operation far exceeds what is allowed by state law for charitable bingo or other forms of gaming.

Native American tribes across the country –including the Kickapoo in the Texas border city of Eagle Pass – legally operate casinos under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, a 1988 federal law that pushed states to negotiate gaming compacts with Native American tribes.

But the Tigua of El Paso and the Alabama-Coushatta of East Texas aren’t covered by the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, federal courts have consistently ruled.

Instead, gambling on Tigua or Alabama-Coushatta land is limited by the Restoration Act, a 1987 federal law that for the first time gave them federal recognition as Native American tribes. The Restoration Act barred the two tribes from offering any gambling not authorized by state law.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Keith Giblin of Lufkin, Texas, last year ruled that the Alabama-Coushatta tribe was violating Texas law by offering gambling, but the tribe’s Naskila Gaming casino remains open while the tribe appeals his ruling. The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral arguments in the case in January and is expected to issue a ruling in coming weeks.

If Martinez declines the Tigua request to reconsider his summary judgment order, the tribe almost certainly will appeal to the 5th Circuit, which has twice ruled that Tigua gambling operations violated state law. The Supreme Court has declined to take up prior Tigua appeals of 5th Circuit rulings.

Congress or the Texas Legislature could pass laws that would authorize gambling for the Tiguas and Alabama-Coushatta, though previous efforts have failed. In his ruling, Martinez encouraged the tribes to try again with Congress.

“The court is cognizant than an injunction will have a substantial impact on the pueblo community. Accordingly, the court joins the refrain of judges who have urged the tribes bound by the Restoration Act to petition Congress to modify or replace the Restoration Act if they would like to conduct gaming on the reservation,” he wrote.

The last significant Tigua attempt to get Congress to reform gambling laws came in 2002, when notorious lobbyist Jack Abramoff convinced the tribe to pay him $4.2 million to slip gambling legalization into an unrelated voting reform measure.

At the same time, Abramoff and his associates were being paid by a Louisiana tribe to block expansion of Indian gambling in Texas because of fears it would reduce the number of Texans traveling to their Louisiana casino.

”I wish those moronic Tiguas were smarter in their political contributions. I’d love us to get our mitts on that moolah!! Oh well, stupid folks get wiped out,”Abramoff wrote to a colleague in 2002, just before approaching the El Paso tribe with his lobbying offer.

Abramoff’s efforts to sneak Tigua gambling legalization through Congress failed. He was later convicted in federal court of swindling the Tigua and other Native American tribes and sentenced to six years in prison.

In the most recent congressional effort to allow gaming by the two tribes, Rep. Brian Babin, a Texas Republican whose district includes the Alabama-Coushatta reservation, introduced the “Ysleta del Sur Pueblo and Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas Equal and Fair Opportunity Settlement Act” in January. The bill has 20 co-sponsors, equally divided between Democrats and Republicans.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, who has led the state’s latest lawsuit against the Tigua since 2017, opposed an identical bill when Babin introduced it last year.

“Over several decades, the state has invested an almost immeasurable amount of time and money to settle this question and establish a consistent and uniform rule of law over gambling in Texas,” Paxton wrote, without mentioning the separate gambling activity allowed for the Kickapoo. “The proposed congressional legislation seeks to undo those efforts. Importantly, if enacted, it will not fully resolve all questions of law surrounding what types of gambling would be allowed on lands owned by the Ysleta del Sur Pueblo and Alabama-Coushatta tribes. In short, it would inject uncertainty into the legal clarity that has come at great cost to the taxpayers of Texas.”

 

 

Click hear to read Texas moves to prohibit Tigua casino gambling in El Paso

Categories: Local Blogs

Saturday

ElPasoSpeak - Sat, 03/02/2019 - 5:00am

Today the topic is open.

Let us know what you are thinking about.

We deserve better.

Brutus

Categories: Local Blogs

GOP Sen. Kevin Cramer Says Trump's Emergency Declaration Is 'Unnecessary'

US Immigration Reform Forum - Sat, 03/02/2019 - 12:05am
GOP Sen. Kevin Cramer Says Trump's Emergency Declaration Is 'Unnecessary'

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Homeland Security and Florida Cops Spied on Chinese Massage Workers for Months but Still Couldn't Find Evidence of Human Trafficking

US Immigration Reform Forum - Sat, 03/02/2019 - 12:05am
Homeland Security and Florida Cops Spied on Chinese Massage Workers for Months but Still Couldn't Find Evidence of Human Trafficking

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Maps: Sanctuary Cities, Counties, and States

US Immigration Reform Forum - Sat, 03/02/2019 - 12:05am
Maps: Sanctuary Cities, Counties, and States

Bryan Griffith
March 1, 2019 - 1:35pm
Source: Maps: Sanctuar...
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Reflections on Allegations of Migrant Minor Abuse

US Immigration Reform Forum - Sat, 03/02/2019 - 12:05am
Reflections on Allegations of Migrant Minor Abuse

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What are we to make of a situation where minors who claim that they are victims of perse...

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Panel: The Value of Foreign Diplomas

US Immigration Reform Forum - Sat, 03/02/2019 - 12:05am
Panel: The Value of Foreign Diplomas

[html]Bryan Griffith
February 26, 2019 - 2:53pm

           
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by Dr. Radut