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Worry About Automation and Not Immigrants

EPN - Border Analysis - Wed, 03/13/2019 - 10:00pm
On Tuesday night my family and I had dinner at a Fuddruckers in Orlando. It was late in […]
Categories: Local Blogs

Volunteers Sentenced for Leaving Food and Water for Migrants in the Arizona Desert

US Immigration Reform Forum - Wed, 03/13/2019 - 12:08pm
Volunteers Sentenced for Leaving Food and Water for Migrants in the Arizona Desert


Source: Volunteers Sentenced for Leaving Food and Water for Migrants in the Arizona Desert

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Reason Magazine Immigration Feed
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Judge Blocks USCIS in Immigration/Marriage Fraud Case

US Immigration Reform Forum - Wed, 03/13/2019 - 12:08pm
Judge Blocks USCIS in Immigration/Marriage Fraud Case

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Another indication of how difficult it is to cope with immigration-related marriage ...

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Immigration Control Is Highlighted in the President's Proposed FY 2020 Budget

US Immigration Reform Forum - Wed, 03/13/2019 - 12:08pm
Immigration Control Is Highlighted in the President's Proposed FY 2020 Budget

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This budget is remarkable, and quite possibly unprecedented,...

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Infectious Diseases Making the Border Crisis Worse

US Immigration Reform Forum - Wed, 03/13/2019 - 12:08pm
Infectious Diseases Making the Border Crisis Worse

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The danger posed by communicable diseases is yet another reason to discourage a wave of...

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Response to the American Immigration Council on the Value of Foreign Degrees

US Immigration Reform Forum - Wed, 03/13/2019 - 12:08pm
Response to the American Immigration Council on the Value of Foreign Degrees

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The Center recently published my report (and hosted an event)...

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Lost in Translation: How Irish-Americans transformed the sacred legacy of St. Patrick’s Day into a drinking festival

Borderzine - Wed, 03/13/2019 - 9:51am

James Farrelly, University of Dayton

In 1997, my students and I traveled to Croagh Patrick, a mountain in County Mayo, as part of a study abroad program course on Irish literature I was teaching for the University of Dayton. I wanted my students to visit the place where, each July, thousands of pilgrims pay homage to St. Patrick, who, according to lore, fasted and prayed on the summit for 40 days.

While there, our tour guide relayed the story of how St. Patrick, as he lay on his death bed on March 17 in A.D. 461, supposedly asked those gathered around him to toast his heavenly journey with a “wee drop of whiskey” to ease their pain.

The mention of whiskey left me wondering if St. Patrick may have unintentionally influenced the way most of the world celebrates the holiday today: by drinking.

It wasn’t always this way. The Festival of St. Patrick began in the 17th century as a religious and cultural commemoration of the bishop who brought Christianity to Ireland. In Ireland, there’s still an important religious and cultural component to the holiday, even as it has simply become an excuse to wear green and heavily drink in the rest of the world.

The legend of St. Patrick

Because historical details about St. Patrick’s life remain shrouded in speculation, scholars are often stymied in their attempts to separate fact from legend.

In his spiritual memoir, “Confessio,” St. Patrick describes how he was brought to Ireland as a slave. He eventually escaped, rejoining his family in Britain, probably Scotland. But while there, he had a recurring dream, in which the “Voice of the Irish” called to him to return to Ireland in order to baptize and minister to them. So he did.

A stained glass image of St. Patrick in St. Benin’s Church in Kilbennan, County Galway, Ireland.
Andreas F. Borchert/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA

 

 

The Irish revere the account of this dream described in the “Confessio”; they accept the simplicity and fervor of his words and feel a debt of gratitude for his unselfish commitment to their spiritual well-being.

St. Patrick’s efforts to convert the Irish to Catholicism were never easy. Viewing him as a challenge to their power and authority, the high kings of Ireland and the pagan high priests, called Druids, resisted his efforts to make inroads with the population.

But through his missionary zeal, he was able to fuse Irish culture into Christianity, whether it was through the introduction of the Celtic Cross or the use of bonfires to celebrate feasts like Easter.

Again, many of these stories could amount to no more than myth. Nonetheless, centuries after his death, the Irish continue to show their gratitude for their patron saint by wearing a spray of shamrocks on March 17. They start the day with mass, followed by a daylong feast, and prayer and reflection at night.

St. Paddy’s Day goes global

From 1820 to 1860, almost 2 million people left Ireland, many due to the potato famine in the 1840s and 1850s. More followed in the 20th century to reunite with relatives and escape poverty and joblessness back home.

Once settled, they found new ways to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and their Irish identity in their new homes.

Irish-Americans, especially, were quick to transform March 17 into a commercial enterprise. The mandatory “wearin’ of the green” in all its garishness is a far cry from the original tradition of wearing a spray of shamrocks to honor St. Patrick’s death and celebrate Irish solidarity. Parades famously sprung up – especially in New York and Boston – revelry ensued and, sure enough, even the beer became green.

Children of Irish-Americans in the United States have absorbed Irish culture at a distance. Many probably know that St. Patrick is Ireland’s patron saint. But they might not fully appreciate his mythic stature for kids growing up on the emerald isle.

Ask children of any age in Ireland what they know about St. Patrick, and they will regale you with stories of his magical abilities, from his power to drive the snakes out of Ireland to his use of the three leaves and one stem of the shamrock to demystify the Trinity doctrine of the Catholic Church.

They see St. Patrick as a miracle worker, and as adults, they keep the legends alive in their own ways. Some follow St. Patrick’s footsteps all around Ireland – from well to hill to alter to chapel – seeking his blessing and bounty wherever their journeys take them.

Raising a glass

Of course, in America, the holy day is really a party, above all else.

This year, Americans are expected to spend US$5.61 billion celebrating, with 13 million pints of Guinness consumed. Some parts of the country plan a pre-celebration on Sept. 17 – or, as they call it, “Halfway to St. Patrick’s Day.”

Where all of this leads is anyone’s guess. But beginning in the 1990s, Ireland seemed to grasp the earning potential of the Americanized version. Today, March 17 remains a holy day for the natives and a holiday for tourists from around the world, with pubs raking in the euros on St. Patrick’s Day.

But I’ve always wondered: What if St. Patrick had requested a silent prayer instead of “a wee drop of whiskey” to toast his passing? Would his celebration have stayed more sacred than profane?

James Farrelly, Professor of English, University of Dayton

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Click hear to read Lost in Translation: How Irish-Americans transformed the sacred legacy of St. Patrick’s Day into a drinking festival

Categories: Local Blogs

EPISD–district 6

ElPasoSpeak - Wed, 03/13/2019 - 5:00am

Some citizens have raised a concern about the residency facts relating to a candidate for EPISD’s district 6 seat.

The candidate, Mr. Freddy Khlayel-Avalos, seems to have a significant history of involvement with several community causes and might prove to be a dedicated board member.

His voter registration shows his home to be at his parent’s house on Canyon Run (district 6).

He owns a house on Centennial (district 6) that he may be renting out.

He shows his mailing address to be on Silver Springs in an apartment complex (district 7).

We invite him to clarify the situation for us.  We don’t want someone who appears to be a good candidate to lose votes because of misunderstandings about his residence.

We deserve better

Brutus

Categories: Local Blogs

Maps: Sanctuary Cities, Counties, and States

US Immigration Reform Forum - Wed, 03/13/2019 - 12:11am
Maps: Sanctuary Cities, Counties, and States

Bryan Griffith
March 12, 2019 - 1:02pm
Source: Maps: Sanctua...
Categories: Local Blogs

The Complicity and Duplicity of Kate del Castillo

EPN - Border Analysis - Tue, 03/12/2019 - 10:00pm
Malinchista is a term used by Mexicans against other Mexicans that denigrate México for personal gain. There is […]
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Visa-Free Travel to Europe for Americans Is Changing in 2021

US Immigration Reform Forum - Tue, 03/12/2019 - 12:09pm
Visa-Free Travel to Europe for Americans Is Changing in 2021

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While both ETIAS and ESTA are an additional bureaucratic procedure imposed by...

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Mayor's race heats up way too early

Refuse the Juice - Tue, 03/12/2019 - 10:58am
Mayor Dee Margo has already announced his reelection bid and Former Mayor Oscar Leeser has put his name in the hat as well. We also hear that Ted Houghton wants to run. This only leaves about 50 other rich white... Brad Kanus
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EPISD at it again

ElPasoSpeak - Tue, 03/12/2019 - 6:18am

In EPISD reinventing the wheel we mentioned an agenda item that would have allowed the district to spend more than a half million dollars to have a company write a software program that would be an “all-in-one enrollment solution”.  The money was to be for the first year of the effort.

Evidently Mr. Dan Wever noticed the item and contacted some board members who pulled the item off of the agenda.

The Times wrote EPISD audit finds ‘indicators of vendor favoritism’ related to bond contract in January of 2018.

Now we see an agenda item for a project that was not bid but that someone wanted to give to a vendor whose name was not even published.

We deserve better

Brutus

Categories: Local Blogs

The Smuggling of Cocaine and Heroine by Sea Increase Triple

El Daily Post - Mon, 03/11/2019 - 10:22pm
Smuggling cocaine and heroin become one of reasons why Donald Trump strengthen the eyes of sea border in Mexico-American border since he swore as the president of America. It occurs because the number of smuggling cocaine illegally increase triple from 2016 to 2018. It is a surprised number which will shock everyone to read it. Smuggling in Numbers Smuggling seems hard for government to eradicate it. There are many aspects that can be the reasons.
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Human Rights, El Chapo and Escape

EPN - Border Analysis - Mon, 03/11/2019 - 10:00pm
So how come America can keep El Chapo locked up and why not México? After all, El Chapo […]
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Ninth Circuit Rules Expedited Removal Review Violates the Constitution

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/11/2019 - 6:05pm
Ninth Circuit Rules Expedited Removal Review Violates the Constitution

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Until the Supreme Court resolves the circuit split,  this decision ...

Categories: Local Blogs

First Lady Visits a Gulen School Which Prefers to Hire Alien Teachers

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/11/2019 - 6:05pm
First Lady Visits a Gulen School Which Prefers to Hire Alien Teachers

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Maybe the first lady's staff in the future should look a little more...

Categories: Local Blogs

Democratic Lawmakers Don't Want to Know When Illegal Aliens Buy Guns

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/11/2019 - 6:05pm
Democratic Lawmakers Don't Want to Know When Illegal Aliens Buy Guns

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This seems like exactly the kind of amendment that both sides of the ...

Categories: Local Blogs

Jessica Vaughan Discusses the Crisis at the Border

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/11/2019 - 6:05pm
Jessica Vaughan Discusses the Crisis at the Border

[html]Originally Aired by FOX Buisness on February 8, 2019
     
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Humanitarian and National Security Disaster at the Border

US Immigration Reform Forum - Mon, 03/11/2019 - 6:05pm
Humanitarian and National Security Disaster at the Border

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The influx of parents and children along the Southwest border is better understo...

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by Dr. Radut